Stiff single leg deadlift and Swap exercise

Stiff single leg deadlift and Swap exercise

August 17, 2021

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Dr. Janhvi Vayada

Pediatric Nutrition Services
The SLD is a functional exercise that can be used by athletes for improving balance and coordination. Include it in your warm ups for better stability. Our expert physio Janhvi Vayada explains it in detail in our latest blog article

This is a beneficial postural and functional exercise.

The exercise aims to help in balance, coordination and stability of the whole body.

This exercise can be done by advance level athletes.

The exercise is used as a pre-exercise mobility drill, or for improving hip biomechanics & post- injury rehabilitation.

Exercise technique:

  • Stand on one leg and tilt the torso forward from hip joint, by simultaneously bending the knee slightly.
  • Swap the kettlebell from hand to hand.

The swapping of the weight of kettlebell helps to challenge the muscles of the core, improves the balance and strengthens the hip stabilisers.

Role of holding and shifting the kettlebell weight:

  • It activates the oblique and hip muscles.
  • Challenges nervous system to adapt to shift in the load.

Common mistakes while doing this exercise:

  • Not reversing the movement once an overstretch is felt in the hamstring muscle.
  • Tight hamstring/ poor hamstring flexibility.
  • Excessively rotating the hip outwards/ foot of the leg in the air pointing excessively outwards.
  • Bending the knee of the leg at the back/ weight-bearing leg.

How to improve on the exercise:

  • Using a resistance band/ using body weight, to improve  the quality of the movement and feedback.
  • Reversing the movement once the below-knee level is reached, to avoid overcompensation of the pelvis.
  • Practicing the “superman” or “airplane” pose in standing.

Muscles working in this exercise:

  • Glutes: gluteus maximus.
  • Hamstrings are the helper muscles and help in the lengthening.
  • Spine stabilising muscles, the abdomen muscles, the diaphragm, the hip rotators, gluteus medius and minimus, the trapezius muscle of upper back.

Dr. Janhvi Vayada – Clinical Sports Physiotherapist

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